Sunday, June 30, 2013

Does Blood Type Affect Plasma Donation?

Q: Can I Donate Plasma With My Blood Type?

Answer: Yes, all blood types, including A, B, AB, and O types can donate plasma without getting rejected. Blood types are blood types, and not plasma types, and so don't affect who can give/receive plasma donations. Your blood plasma is mostly water (over 90 percent water) and doesn't have protein antigens which make the plasma incompatible with someone else's plasma.

What is My Blood Type?

Human blood types or blood groups are classed as the following: A, O, AB, and B. Type O blood is the most common blood type, with over 30 percent of the population being type O. AB is the rarest, with less than 3 percent of the population having type AB blood. Blood types are classified by protein antigens which coat the red blood cells.

Can I Donate With Rh Positive/Negative Blood?

Yes, both Rh positive and Rh negative factor donors can give blood plasma. Rh (rhesus factor) in blood doesn't cross over to blood plasma.

Will I Make More Money Donating Plasma if I Have a Rare Blood Type?

Even though AB blood type donors have a blood type compatible with only 3 percent of the population, their rare blood type doesn't mean they make more money for plasma donating. And common blood types, like type O blood, make the same amount donating as rare blood types. In other words, all types of blood get the same compensation amount. **


** If you have other blood abnormalities, like high white blood cell count, or sickle cell anemia, the plasma center will make more money from studying your blood and creating medications. However, you the donor, usually won't know, or even be compensated more money for different blood types/blood abnormalities.

54 comments:

  1. Actually, O+ is the common type, O- is extremely rare, and everyone can accept O-, but a person with O- can only accept O-. I have O- blood, I am the Universal blood type, which is great for everyone else, not great for me. As each of the 4 main types can be positive or negative, meaning 8 total, and positive can accept positive and negative but negative can only receive negative, you should be a bit more specific or correct in declaring which is common or rare. My O- blood is certainly not common, among any race. Also, different races have different common blood types. This applies to blood only, not plasma.

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    1. I am a universal donor, rather.

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    2. 4 main groups, 8 types, there is a significant distinction, which should definitely be considered when donating blood or plasma, not for the donor, but the recipient. Anyone can donate of course, but O- blood type is universal for blood donations, and AB+ is universal for plasma donations. Universal means everyone can accept your donation without complications.

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    3. You should do more research. AB groups can receive any of the 4 groups, depending on rH factor. AB- is the rarest blood type, but can receive O-, A-, B-, and AB-. Again, this is for blood. Your information, though mostly irrelevant, is still VERY misleading.

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    4. actually you are wrong, O- is the most common blood type as researched by the American Red Cross

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    5. O negative can only obtain o negative blood but nearly 40 percent of the population has it so its not as rare as you think i have ab negative and people with ab blood are the universal donors when it comes to plasma but when it comes to blood itself everyone except ab can only receive there own blood type ab positive can receive any blood type while ab negative can recieve any negative blood type (o- b- a- or ab-) you also need to educate yourself before judging another persons article

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    8. Anonymous you are wrong! You think you are being smart but your being dumb! Anyone who took a min to look at a red Cross website will tell you that 40 % of the population does not have 0 negative blood! You pretentious ass!

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    9. According to WebMD, only 7-8% of the world's population is O-, while not the rarest blood type, it is the most widely sought blood type because of who it can be given to. AB-is the rarest blood type, only an average of 0.4%of the world's population has AB-. But an O- blood group can be given to A,B,O blood groups.

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    10. This is all assuming that you consider just the a,b and o blood types... There are actually subsets that can be rare in any of the blood types, which has everything to do with antigens either in your blood or missing from your blood that most in your blood type have. They have a national registry for this, and it includes A's, B's, AB's and O's. But for the umbrella terms,
      Ab- is the most uncommon, and O+ is the most common.

      Here's an article that goes into some depth regarding antigens and how they effect your blood type.

      http://mosaicscience.com/story/man-golden-blood

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    11. Are we talking about blood, plasma or platlet donations?
      When giving a blood donation, O- is a universal donor for all groups but can only accept from O-. As it pertains to Plasma, Ab- is the universal donor. But Ab- can only receive plasma from AB-. Facts.

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    12. Some of these comments are silly and unresearched. O+ is most common blood type...not O -. However O - is the universal donor. Also AB - is not universal plasma donor...AB + is.

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    13. Plasma is utilized, the to being clear of the things factor. Plasma is plasma is plasma......

      Negative RH. factors can only receive from negative RH. factors.
      Positive can receive from both.....

      O type is universal donor but not universal recipient..... O+ can receive from o+and o- but o- can only receive from o-....

      Plasma removes the type and factor, making it neutral.


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    14. People. Please don't listen to idiots like this Robert person. He corrected himself in three cones codeine posts. The dudes an idjit. I have AB- which is the rarest but it really doesn't have a beating on plasma. Again people are idiots.

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  2. Yes, I agree with the Robert that this is a HIGHLY inaccurate post. Plasma does contain antibodies, depending on blood type. Only AB blood types have antibody free plasma- making them universal plasma donors (basically the opposite of whole blood donation since AB types have both A & B antigens on red cells. Depending on where you donate, AB plasma donors may be paid more. NIH actually has a special donation program for AB male donors (females who have been pregnant MAY have an antigen that causes problems for the recipient- most donation centers will just test for this though when you donate. NIH avoids additional testing costs by just using male donors).
    http://www.redcrossblood.org/learn-about-blood/blood-types

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  3. I have went to several different facilities that could not determine my blood type...does this make my plasma more rare

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  4. I have o+ blood type I donate to the American red croak... Recently I am considering donating my blood plasma because I misscarried about 6 months ago because I am rh- and the father is rh+ from the reading I have been doing I discovered I can save up to 30 babys per donation!! I'm a little confused by the process can someone help me??!

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  5. I have o+ blood type I donate to the American red cross... Recently I am considering donating my blood plasma because I misscarried about 6 months ago because I am rh- and the father is rh+ from the reading I have been doing I discovered I can save up to 30 babys per donation!! I'm a little confused by the process can someone help me??!

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  6. I have o+ blood type I donate to the American red cross... Recently I am considering donating my blood plasma because I misscarried about 6 months ago because I am rh- and the father is rh+ from the reading I have been doing I discovered I can save up to 30 babys per donation!! I'm a little confused by the process can someone help me??!

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    1. After having miscarriages, you need to be tested for TRALI before donating plasma. (Donate, not paid) (paid plasma does not get transfused into patients. Instead it is used for research and other products. Anything paid for with money cannot be transfused into a patient, per FDA regulations. They consider it a contaminated source) TRALI antigens often appears in women's plasma after multiple pregnancies, and cause a transfused related acute lung infection, and is the most common reason for transfusion related deaths.

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    2. You would need to be tested for the anti-D antibody to know for sure whether your blood could be used for the Rhogam. Just having a miscarriage with an Rh+ father does not mean you developed those antibodies. And if you did develop those antibodies, you need to know as they will affect any future pregnancies you have with an Rh+ father.

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  7. I'm an negative will I be paid a little bit more that common blood types

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  8. I'm an negative will I be paid a little bit more that common blood types

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  9. My local plasma center in Pittsburgh rejected me donating based on my blood type. True Story. So, this article us incorrect! Invalid!

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  10. This is inaccurate. Patients who are Rh- cannot donate plasma as they have anti-Rh. The blood banks do not accept this. RBC transfusions are a different story.

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    1. Actually I am rh- and I donate plasma twice a week.

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    2. Do you make additional for being rh-? I've heard different things

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    3. Do you make additional for being rh-? I've heard different things

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    5. Even if you are Rh-, and you have anti Rh+, it is still needed for patients who have Rh- blood because they can't take Rh+.

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    6. Actually, you only develop those antibodies if you have been previously exposed to Rh+ blood through a transfusion or pregnancy. And since Rh+ blood is almost never given to Rh- people and Rh- women are given the Rhogam during pregnancy, developing those antibodies is extremely rare. So, most Rh- people are fine donating plasma in regards to anti-D antibodies. However, there are several other antigens that are not typed as part of your blood type and anyone can develop antibodies to the ones they don't have if expsoed to foreign blood, once again through transfusion or pregnancy, and then would not be able to donate plasma due to those antibodies. Also, it's rare to develop antibodies during pregnancy as a woman is not usually exposed to the baby's blood, but it does happen.

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  12. I have a small cut on the back of my right hand can I still donated

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  13. I have a small cut on the back of my right hand can I still donated

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  14. have AB - how much can i make per pint ?

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    1. When I donated plasma narizona I received $40 more per week plus a $50 bonus. I also have Ab Neg blood

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    2. When I donated plasma narizona I received $40 more per week plus a $50 bonus. I also have Ab Neg blood

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  15. OK. I am uneducated in this but can anyone tell me if RH negative blood is rare. I am not an alien or descended from Mary Magdalene.

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  16. OK. I am uneducated in this but can anyone tell me if RH negative blood is rare. I am not an alien or descended from Mary Magdalene.

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  17. I am RH- and understand they need donations of RH- plasma. Will I get paid more? I usually donate plasma and didn't know that there is a difference.

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  20. O- is only 7% of the population. Get your facts straight of your writing am article.

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  21. I did receive more money then others when I donated plasma. I have AB negative blood. I'm not sure if it was because of the type or the Rh factor. Others receive $60 per week well I receive $100 per week and a $50 bonus if I donated eight times in one month

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  22. I have AB+ blood and was told I should donate because that makes my blood a universal plasma donor. I'd never heard of this before and always thought only other AB+ people can receive my blood, since the population of AB+ is so low and since we can receive blood from any other type, I figured they would just turn me away. Now I'm hearing that they need AB+ plasma donors and that yes, I can receive the red cells as a universal recipient,nut my fellow AB blood type mates and I can only receive plasma from another AB blood type person. So not donating is a disservice since such a small portion of the population has this blood type . This article says something completely different, so now I'm confused.

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    1. In the world of blood banking O negative is the Universal Donor for RBC's, red blood cells. For plasma AN negative is the Universal Donor. For platelets it doesn't matter the blood type. Blood has receptors on them called antigens. O has A and B antibodies meaning if A or B blood is introduced into the system it will cause the blood to agglutinate or as my daughter puts it,"turns into jello." A has A antigens and B has B antigens and AB has both antigens. O has none. That's why O blood can be given to anyone. AB plasma has no antibodies which is why it can be given to anyone. Platelets are antibody antigen free, as far as blood type is concerned.

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    2. In the world of blood banking O negative is the Universal Donor for RBC's, red blood cells. For plasma AN negative is the Universal Donor. For platelets it doesn't matter the blood type. Blood has receptors on them called antigens. O has A and B antibodies meaning if A or B blood is introduced into the system it will cause the blood to agglutinate or as my daughter puts it,"turns into jello." A has A antigens and B has B antigens and AB has both antigens. O has none. That's why O blood can be given to anyone. AB plasma has no antibodies which is why it can be given to anyone. Platelets are antibody antigen free, as far as blood type is concerned.

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  23. I learned all this in college but have forgotten most of it. So there.

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