Saturday, May 11, 2013

How to Prepare Before and After Plasma Donation


http://www.amazon.com/?_encoding=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&linkCode=ur2&tag=grechecontal-20


Donating plasma is a low risk procedure if you prepare before donation. Donation rejection occurs if you have low iron levels, low levels of protein, donate with a fever above 99 degrees, or have high blood pressure.

So, What to do before Donating Plasma? Avoid: caffeine, smoking and drinking before plasma donating to lower your heart rate. Do not smoke a cigarette in an hour before arriving at the center to donate.


Do: Eat carbohydrate heavy foods to avoid fainting from lack of energy. Finally, drink plenty of water after you donate to replenish fluids. Be well rested before your plasma donation. It is important to relax your mind before plasma donation, for plasma donations can easily empty the mind of juice, and your body of rich, rich plasma juice.

Drink how much water before Donating Plasma?

Drink an extra 16 oz. juice or non-alcoholic fluids before the donation. A couple of glasses of water before you go to is also good. Basically, the water should be your go-to drink the day before and day of each plasma donation.

Water keeps hydration levels up, so be sure to drink plenty of water before and after plasma donation. I usually try to drink at least half a liter of water a day before donating and a few glasses before going to donate.

Drinking plenty of water before the donation process actually speeds up the process. Believe me, it's done wonders for my donation times. Being dehydrated means that you probably will feel bad when you donate, and your hydration levels affect how long it will take a donation. Plus, when I leave the donation center, I was not as dehydrated, because I've still got some water in my system.

Can I have caffeine / alcohol before plasma donation?

Also, avoid caffeine for better health for a smoother plasma donation process. Caffeine can cause increased heart rate, which does not make the process of plasma donation easy. If you drink juice or tea with food or snacks, make sure it is caffeine free. Avoid drinking alcohol the night before and the day of your donation, and at least four hours after donation.

Can I Take Aspirin or Other Analgesic Medication Before Donating Plasma

Bayer aspirin is a blood thinner, so it's not a good idea to donate plasma while on regular aspirin therapy. If you occasionally take aspirin tablets for headaches, or other aches and pains, you must wait 4 hours after taking aspirin to donate plasma. Ideally, don't take aspirin the day of plasma donation at all. This also goes for other headache medicines and blood thinners, like Advil, Advil PM, liquigels, capsules, powders, and sleeping pills with pain medication.

Can I donate while I'm having my period?

Yes, ladies should bare in mind that making a plasma donation when at that time of the month/menstruating is perfectly safe, with excess protective safety measures. Plasma donation can influence additional monthly period cramps, especially while dehydrated, so it's in particular essential for women facing that time of the month to drink excess water before donating. Do not donate when expectant, but, as donating whilst expecting can easily factor pregnancy difficulties, hazardously low liquid degrees, and fainting. Expecting mothers ought to hold off at least 6 months right after being born just before securely making a plasma donation again.

What Are the Best things to eat before Donating Plasma?

Eat a healthy meal before your donation. You want to eat a big meal the night before and eat something high in carbs right before you enter. Pasta is a carbohydrate-rich food especially recommended the night before donating.  Other good foods to eat before donating are macaroni with cheese, mashed potatoes, and baked or steamed vegetables.

Iron rich and protein rich foods are the best things to eat before plasma donation, foods like liver and broccoli. If you do not have enough iron in the blood the plasma donation center will reject you as a donor, at least until you get your low iron levels up.

Ok, so maybe I'm not into health food, but two days a week when I donate, you can bet that I get enough protein, vitamins, iron and carbohydrate snacks, etc, to make my body happy (and not be rejected for donation.) Needless to say, I also take iron pills before and after each donation these days to avoid rejection.

Eat a good meal before and after plasma donating. Eating healthy before plasma donation not only raises the iron levels and protein levels of blood, but it also keeps you from getting sick while donating. Eat foods rich in proteins, some before you go, too (low protein may get you rejected from plasma donating.)

Things to Avoid Eating Before Donating Plasma

Avoid fatty and high-cholesterol foods 24 hours before donation.

Avoid: foods such as hamburgers, fries or ice cream before donating. Eating fatty foods before plasma donation can give your Plasma a milky appearance. Your plasma should be yellow (straw colored) to dark red color. If your plasma has a milky color, you will be banned from plasma donating that day.

Do: snack before and after. Eat healthy snacks (such as a banana or energy bar) after donating.

What to Do After Donating Plasma



Wait to take the bandage off! I've seen numerous donors who impatiently take their bandages off right after donating, then start bleeding all over the donation floor. I've also seen bandages and gauze littering the parking lot (from impatient donors who rip their arm bandages off on the way to their cars.) The bandage and gauze are there to stop bleeding, and prevent infection at the donation site. Wait at least 4 hours before taking the donation bandage off.

After plasma donating, relax your body.

Eat before and after donation, to replenish lost vitamins. Other good foods to eat after donation:


  • Green vegetables (broccoli, lettuce, spinach, kale, and celery)
  • Protein rich foods (red meat, steak, beef, pork, or plant proteins like beans and eggs)
  • Plain yogurt
  • Electrolyte drinks (Gatorade, or other sports waters with electrolytes)
  • Fruits (banana, strawberry, papaya, or pineapple)
  • Plenty of water (especially vitamin enhanced, or sugar water)
What Not to Do After Donating Plasma

Don't carry big items for four hours after giving, and do not workout for one day. Strenuous physical exercise (activity and exercise, energy resistance training, or perhaps cardio workouts) immediately after giving, weight lifting, and also running/cardiopulmonary exercise/jumping jacks, may make the bandage come off, or even re-open the giving vein.

Particularly, do not lift weights the day following selling blood plasma for cash. In the worst case scenario, physical activity following donation can easily increase blood clotting concentrate in the donation vein. Things to not eat or drink the day following donating are alcoholic beverages, saturated fatty foods, and also tobacco smoking. Delay the urge to smoke at least an 60 minute block immediately after donation, and rather a day following donation.

Plasma Center Rejection for Fever

If you feel a fever/high temperature coming on, but only slightly, take your temperature before going to the donation center to donate plasma. Avoid donation rejections if you're feeling sick. Upon returning, the nurses will want to know exactly when your fever breaks, because you will be banned from plasma donating for several days after your high temperature diminishes.

These are tips on how to prepare for plasma donation (and avoid reasons for rejection.)

 Good for you to donate plasma. But the fact that the donation center pays me money for plasma donating is not the only reason I continue to donate plasma long term. Just think, the money is nice, but make sure that your heart is in the right place before you donate.

67 comments:

  1. How would I lower my level of protein? also how long would it take before I could try to donate again? I tried to give plasma today and she said I had an 11.6.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's easy, just watch your protein intake, drink less milk, dairy, meat. ..just watch what you eat the night before and drink at least 4 glasses of water.

      Delete
    2. High blood protein may be caused by something as simple as mild dehydration, increasing the concentration of protein in your bloodstream. In this case, the blood proteins only appear to be elevated. High blood protein may also be a warning sign of chronic inflammation or infection, particularly of the liver. Elevated levels of immune system proteins produced by the bone marrow may raise concerns about certain bone marrow diseases.

      High blood protein levels also may be discovered unexpectedly if a total protein test is included in a group of routine lab tests during a health checkup.

      Possible causes of high blood protein include:

      A bone marrow condition
      Amyloidosis
      Dehydration (which may make blood proteins appear falsely elevated)
      HIV/AIDS
      Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance
      Multiple myeloma

      A high-protein diet doesn't cause high blood protein.

      Delete
  2. Drink some caffeine

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. caffeine will make your heart rate go up which could cause you to not be able to donate dumb ass, be educated bout your body and you should be fine.

      Delete
    2. I walk/run a lot and find myself drinking caffinee right before donating. Normally my HR is 46, and anything under 50 is rejected.

      Delete
    3. My iron is always too high. Usually around 56.

      Delete
  3. You have to wait 48 hours before donating again

    ReplyDelete
  4. I always use the money I get from donating to buy alcohol right after I donate. I've been doing it for 2 years and I feel fine

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thank you for the advice. This is a win win as I am handicap with limited income. I should pass with flying colors with this advice!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I always vomit when it's almost over..why is that if I eat and drink water before donating

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Congrats, your pregnant!!!

      Delete
    2. Regardless of what anyone tells you donating does do a number on your body. Your body is especially sensitive to change. Women especially are subject to this for obvious reasons.

      Delete
    3. I can not give you a specific answer,Iron, vitamins, level of fitness. When I go to donate I bike 4 miles and then I go back 4 miles and I am fine BUT after my donation I sit down & eat a peanut butter & jelly sandwich and drink a big container of water.

      Delete
    4. It is common to vomit during donation no matter what you eat or drink. It is just one of the side affects Vanessa. It has to do with when they are pushing the red blood cells back in your body

      Delete
    5. Ha...about 15 yrs ago I was trying to donate and vomited about 1/2 way through. Turns out I was pregnant. I started to donate again and no issues at all ..go figure lol

      Delete
    6. For me it was I did not eat a good amount of food.

      Delete
    7. For me it was I did not eat a good amount of food.

      Delete
  7. Fell like I have gas in my chest after donating why?

    ReplyDelete
  8. How can you have to much protein?

    ReplyDelete
  9. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
  10. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  11. What will happen if I drink before donating?

    ReplyDelete
  12. If I drank some coffee in the morning, will it still affect my pulse in the afternoon? It was one cup.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't worry about that. Honestly this isn't as big a deal as everyone makes it out to be SO LONG as you have good cardiovascular health. If you are fit and do a decent amount of cardio on a regular basis your heart can regulate itself pretty well, even with a cup of coffee in your system

      Delete
  13. The trick to getting your pulse down for a FACT: try to take a deep breathe like singers do(making your stomach poke out when sucking in and pull in when blowing out). Try to time your deep calm inhale with the machine(so that you take it before the air is full and starts reading your pulse. Once its reading your pulse, blow air out slowly. Take a short-calm but somewhat deep breathe but make it super short and then repeat the long slow exhale. You will feel like you are suffocating but your pulse will go down by over a dozen causing you to beat it. I was deferred 3 days in a row so trust me i practiced and mastered this(just like how I suck on 2 pieces of ice under my tongue before I walk there). Be careful though and know your body. These things are put in place to help you. An abnormally fast pulse can cause the needle to have problems so dont cheat too hard. I use this method because I hate being deferred just because I walked up there and Im a big guy and my body is warmer than most by a point. Now that you know the tricks, share the wealth of info with others.

    ReplyDelete
  14. How long after eating does it take fir your protein levels to increase

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi,

    First off thanks for your blog! Secondly, I'm curious as to which main nutrients are lost during a donation? I notice you say "replenish vitamins lost"

    I know iron plays a big role in make sure you can donate. Do you think by donating these iron levels lower?

    Thanks for your time

    -Steve

    ReplyDelete
  16. my right arm and leg in right side the day after I donated plasma had a real bad sharp pains what would that be from

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is probably a reaction from the anticoagulant they use. My reaction until my body got used to it was pain in my jaw and arm

      Delete
  17. Very informative, just maybe touch up the grammar and word choice a tad; it made the article clumsier and more difficult to read than it had to be

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would have to agree.

      Delete
  18. what are the risk if you have alcohol the night before donating?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alcohol is a diuretic (makes you pee) so is more likely to dehydrate you. It also dilates your blood vessels, so can lower your blood pressure and cause you to faint... It's also just not great for the people on the receiving end - remember that most people who need plasma aren't too healthy, so you want your plasma / blood to be as clean as possible to give them a chance.

      Delete
  19. I passed out while on my last cycle. I did not eat before going in. I did drink water before going , my blood pressure was 135/116 but one of the workers was in a bad mood and let me donate. She told me not to say anything. Did i pass out because of that or because i did not eat . Remember it was at the last run/cycle when i passed out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Also it was high because i cleaned my car out before donating my dog had crapped all in my backseat sh** was everywhere i shouldve waited a hour before getting my finger pricked and vitals checked

      Delete
  20. The last 4 times I have donated I have gotten very light headed, hot and nauseous about 5 hours later. Any idea what the problem is?

    ReplyDelete
  21. I fainted last time I tried to donate, what is best to do to keep that from happening again?

    ReplyDelete
  22. Eat a good balanced meal and drink alot of water that helps i felt that way on my first visit i didnt eat and i was dehydrated worse feeling.

    ReplyDelete
  23. is baked fish (haddock) something good to eat the night before donating??

    ReplyDelete
  24. This will be my first time donating, and I'm nervous to pass out. So any idea on what you can do so that doesn't happen? And what di they do if you do pass out?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you ate laying down or reclining, it helps decrease the chance of passing out. When you are ready to leave, sit up and stand up very slowly and make sure you are ok before walking away from the bed/chair.

      Delete
  25. Eat a well balanced meal, just drink plenty of water, and relax an I'm sure u will be ok. THINK POSITIVE U WILL NOT PASS OUT (SMILE)

    ReplyDelete
  26. Is tuna a good thing to eat the night before donating? This will be my first time donating

    ReplyDelete
  27. Drink plenty of red bull gives many wings

    ReplyDelete
  28. Is it OK to workout before donating

    ReplyDelete
  29. After I donate I always am so hungary! Even if I eat right before I donate. So I just take something to eat with me. Also I'll be very tired for few hours so I go home and take it easy! But I live the idea of helping others and I don't mind the small side affects from it!

    ReplyDelete
  30. Does anybody have any useful tips on maintaining body temperature. I almost always run an oral temp of around 99.5 - 99.8 which results in automatic deferral because the upper limit for temp is 99.6.

    Also note that I feel absolutely no signs or symptoms of fever or sickness anytime I go in. Sometimes I take the bus or drive there, other times I'm walking inside from the cold.

    I'm not concerned with low temp as you get up to three retests for low temp, but too high and you're deferred for the day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Drink something cold before you donate

      Delete
  31. So, I read the info on being hydrated before donating but is that a suggestion so people will feel more comfortable?
    The reason I am asking is because I donated on 12/24/15 and then just went back this Saturday to donate again but the nurse said I could not do it because someone made a mistake and I was "dry" the last donation. So, I was offered to give a sample of blood or come back after I made sure I was hydrated. I gave a sample that day. I'm just waiting for the results.
    Is there another possible reason I was asked to give a another sample and what test do they do prior to tell if I'm hydrated? Finger prick?
    Any assistance is appreciated.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  32. I am so over this, I eat so much protein foods, I make sure I eat tons of stuff with protein in it for 2 days before I donate and yesterday my protein level was only 6.0. Just barely made it to donate. I even ate salmon the night before along with so many other protein foods. 6.7 is the highest my protein level has ever been in the 7 months, since my first donation. Any suggestions?

    ReplyDelete
  33. I am having this problem and learned it might be due to donating too frequently, more that my body can tolerate. Suggestion was to take a break, let my body recoupe and donate after a few weeks.

    ReplyDelete
  34. A break helps (especially before you get deferred for it) and I have found eggs (3-egg omelets) to keep my protein up.

    ReplyDelete
  35. It's all I can do to make sure my protein level is high enough. Two days before and the morning of that's all I eat is foods with protein. All my other numbers are fine. I always worry that my protein level isn't going to be high enough. I've been deferred twice since last June and I've gained 20 pounds since last June, which really sucks. I'll be really lucky if I hit 6.4 for my first donation and 6.2 or 6.0 for my second donation of the week. I even drink Whey Protein drinks all the time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have the same issue. Last year I began donating one year post partum. I was 6 pounds heavier than pre pregnancy and after all this with my protein wound up gaining 11 pounds. I figured out I need to take breaks like 2 weeks donating 1 week off. A few months ago I started really trying to loose weight and have started having issues donating again. I was just put on deferral for low protein in my speed test. I would probably just stop because it is stressful and I have started to worry that I have a health issue I am unaware of but I am paying for my daughters braces with my plasma money. I am thinking maybr I am just not getting enough other nutrients and my body is somehow quickly metabolizing the protein. I am going to stop concentrating so much on just protein.

      Delete
    2. If your trying not to gain weight, I found it's better to eat meals here and there as needed and then just prep the day before, day of, and day after a donation. Of special importance is knowing WHEN your going to donate. Regular eating is fine too ofc, but you have to eat shortly before the donation, no matter what.

      There is a reason most centers ask if you've had a meal at least 4 hours prior to donating. They are taking the proteins from the fluid in your body and it metabolizes quickly, plus the process of donating is hard on the body, so they need to make sure it's a RECENT meal.

      So what I do is I eat a proper meal a day beforehand to get my body strong, then an hour or so before the actual donation. Irrc, it takes the body around 15-30 mins to process water and 30 mins - 2 hours to process the proteins into your veins.

      So again, that recent meal is key. If you eat shortly before and then wait about an hour after eating to go in, you'll usually find your numbers are good and your not gonna be very sick. Think of it like prepping your body for the draw.

      Electrolytes are a must too, especially potassium, as the donation process can drain those quickly. Water is obvious. If you notice your proteins dropping steadily over time even doing this, it means your body needs a recovery time of at least 4-5 days to fully process nutrients and catch back up.

      Delete
  36. Donated first time this SAT...no issues, I'll be doing it again...however I don't thinks it's wise to do this more than 3-4 times a month; better to let you body heal FULLY and establish a routing of healthy eating and activity before forcing in twice a week with a day in between...

    ...at least for someone doing this long-term...

    ReplyDelete
  37. I've been considering donating for a while...My only question is: Would I be ok to drive after donating?

    ReplyDelete
  38. I had a reaction on my last cycle, I was almost done, I started to feel nauseousafe, then I began to sweat & it felt like everything was closing down. The phlebotomist put my feet up, I drank water & she gave me ice packs. But Idk why I had that reaction. I donated twice prior & I didn't have that issue.

    ReplyDelete
  39. I had a reaction on my last cycle, I was almost done, I started to feel nauseousafe, then I began to sweat & it felt like everything was closing down. The phlebotomist put my feet up, I drank water & she gave me ice packs. But Idk why I had that reaction. I donated twice prior & I didn't have that issue.

    ReplyDelete
  40. same thing happened to me. i had donated close to 50 times with no problems, then felt sick to stomach and dizzy and sweaty thought i was going to faint. then i was told they had changed the anticoagulant brand. i think it was too strong or something. but anyway the plasma center changed back to the original formula and all is good again. oh btw.... i wasnt the only one having this problem. it helps to drink alot of water and a glass of oj before you donate too. dont forget it takes about 30 min for liquids to fully enter your system.

    ReplyDelete
  41. I have been trying to donate my plasma for about a month now and I'm constantly low on my iron level. I'm eating iron rich foods the day before and day of donation, and taking an iron supplement, but I can't get above 37. I need a 38 or higher to donate...any suggestions?

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...